Alex Garland:
EX MACHINA




  • Gallery of Faces…

    Director/Writer Alex Garland confers with actress Alicia Vikander, who plays the sentient A.I. Ava...

    Photo by Aimee Spinks ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Gallery of Faces…

    Ava [Alicia Vikander] discovers her face among the gallery…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Face to Face…

    Ava [Alicia Vikander] meets her face…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    There’s an elegance to the lab, just as there is to the thought process it represents…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    Garland works out a scene with Oscar Isaac, who plays brilliant A.I. creator Nathan Bateman, and Director of Photography Rob Hardy [hidden by camera]…

    Photo by Aimee Spinks ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    Nathan [Oscar Isaac] reveals to his guest and new A.I. evaluator Caleb [Domhnall Gleeson] the bodyworks he used to create Ava and her predecessors…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    Set Decorator Michelle Day SDSA discloses, “We were able to use the CGI early renderings of Ava’s interior and have her torso 3D-printed so it’s an exact physical copy of her CGI body. The limbs were made using traditional model making techniques…”

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    Nathan [Oscar Isaac] shows Caleb [Domhnall Gleeson] the brain component…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    “We model-made the physical A.I. brain with wet ware,” says Day. “Alex wanted this to have a jellyfish look, so we did liquid-filled capsules and the wet ware movement was enhanced in post…”

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    “For the skull’s concave interior, where the brain sits, we studied patterns in nature…mathematical but organic…for these sensors,” Day explains.

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    The skulls were model-made, then chrome-plated…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    Parts storage cabinets – all elements custom-designed and manufactured…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • A.I. Construction Lab…

    Caleb [Domhnall Gleeson] studies clones of Ava’s face…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Observation Room…

    Production Designer Mark Digby points out, “We flipped around the theology about how we observe people. Caleb [Domhnall Gleeson] is actually enclosed in a glass box looking out at Ava [Alicia Vikander], who can view him by walking around 270 degrees in her glass box.”

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Observation Room…

    Garland discusses a scene with Vikander and Gleeson.

    Photo by Aimee Spinks ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Ava’s Room…

    This is Ava’s entire world, a glass-walled cage. She’s entrapped, the tree and garden a tease, as she has no access to them.
    This entire set was a build at Pinewood Studios.

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.







  • Nathan’s Living Room…

    “We took the beautiful rock wall at the amazing Fjora House location as the pitch for the palette and went from there with pops of earth and water tones,” says Day.

    Domhnall Gleeson. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.






  • Nathan’s Living Room…

    Details referencing the brain and the human skeleton are subtlely and artistically slipped in throughout the film. Here, an exquisite beaded Mexican Huichol skull that Day was able to have commissioned in the room’s quiet palette…

    Domhnall Gleeson. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.






  • Nathan’s Living Room…

    “We wanted to convey wealth, comfort but not overstate,” notes Day. “The copper pendent lights were commissioned from David Derksen, the blue chairs were a flea market find, which we reupholstered along with the day bed.”

    Domhnall Gleeson, Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.






  • Deck outdoor room…

    Oscar Isaac as Nathan
    Day had the punching bag custom-made. “It was scripted originally to split at one point, as a show of Nathan’s Alpha-Male aggression.”

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Deck outdoor room…

    Nathan Bateman [Oscar Isaac] auspiciously greets his employee/guest Caleb Smith [Domhnall Gleeson]. Vintage rosewood/leather Brazilian safari chairs with industrial upcycled table…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Dining area looking onto deck…

    The bench and tables were custom-designed, incorporating steel legs and riven slate tops…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Nathan’s living space…

    Inherent in Nathan’s work is distillation, filtering of the unnecessary and honing to the best possible version. Digby points out, “There is a matter of design functionality that says if you don't need something, it doesn't have to be there.” Thus, this minimal near-perfect corner…

    Domhnall Gleeson, Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Kitchen…

    The controlled set elements both reflect and contrast with the natural elements surrounding the kitchen. Here Garland [center] details a scene with Gleeson and Isaac.

    Photo by Aimee Spinks ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Kitchen & bar area…

    Another example of the clean line of minimalistic contemporary design accented with artisanal hand-made elements, such as the kilim pillow, which also reflects Nathan’s constant search for patterns…

    Domhnall Gleeson, Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.






  • Kitchen, bar & dining space…

    Day notes, “We fitted this light-box kitchen area into the spa area of the Juvet hotel location. The chair was a flea market find. We stripped the metal and re-upholstered with cowhides. Again, the table & bench were our design of steel bases and riven slate tops.” The metal-X-cross hanging light fixture was specifically designed for night scenes...

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Multi-function bar: alcohol, coffee, juice…

    Vintage Braun items give homage to famed Functionalist designer Dieter Rams. Day had the glass tray painted as a nod to José Guadalupe Posada whose satirical drawings of skulls and skeletons are still politically acute over a century later…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Multi-function bar: alcohol, coffee, juice…

    Day adds focused whimsy…a vintage advertisement for a headache remedy…while the makings of a hangover and the tools for a cure sit nearby...

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Kitchen, bar & dining space…

    Caleb [Domhnall Gleeson] contemplates.
    Note in the background the details mentioned in the previous photos…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Nathan’s Bedroom…

    “We were able to repeat the rock wall detail of the Fjora house location in our set build at Pinewood,” says Day. Digby incorporated curved walls. Wardrobes and bed were custom-designed…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Pollock painting…

    Day commissioned artist Charlie Cobb to reproduce this Pollock drip painting using as near-to-possible materials, scale and techniques. 2 versions were made…

    Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Pollock painting…

    Garland, Isaac and Hardy [back to camera] check the detailing of this wall-sized work…

    Photo by Aimee Spinks ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.






  • Pollock painting…

    “There is no criterion by which to recognize what is a color, except that it is one of our colors.” A quote from philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, whose theories were extremely influential in Nathan’s work…
    Oscar Isaac as Nathan

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Nathan’s Office…

    “The Post-It notes were a scripted item,” Day relates. “I feel the decision to curve the wall greatly enhanced this back-to-analog organizing method.
    All of these notes are re:Nathan’s A.I.s, but they do represent his own mind…”

    Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.






  • Nathan’s Office…

    The desk was designed with a folded dark steel top wrapping a cherry wood base. Note the carved orangutan skull on the custom credenza. Day reveals, “We also had made a Cuneiform script tablet, believing that as an author of unique computer code, Nathan would have a interest in ancient language commutation…

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Nathan’s Office…

    “The world is the totality of facts, not of things.”
    --Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Nathan’s office – Titian…

    The painting of the 3 human heads floating above 3 animal heads is a reproduction of Titian’s An Allegory of Prudence, the theme of which is the “The Three Ages of Man”.
    Another brilliant choice by Day…

    Oscar Isaac. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Maintenance chamber…

    Nathan [Oscar Isaac] controls the electricity during a power outage caused by Ava

    Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.





  • Nathan’s Office…

    “Nothing is so difficult as not deceiving oneself.”
    --Ludwig Wittgenstein

    Domhnall Gleeson. Photo ©2015 A24. All Rights Reserved.


"Logic is not a body of doctrine, but a mirror-image of the world. 
Logic is transcendental
..."

 Ludwig Wittgenstein

 

Caleb Smith [Domhnall Gleeson], a programmer at the world’s largest internet-search giant, wins a competition to spend a week at the exceedingly private mountain estate of the company's brilliant and reclusive CEO, Nathan Bateman [Oscar Isaac]. Upon his arrival, Caleb learns that Nathan has chosen him to conduct a Turing test, evaluating the capabilities and, ultimately, the consciousness of Nathan’s latest experiment in artificial intelligence. Ava [Alicia Vikander] is a breathtaking A.I. whose emotional intelligence proves more sophisticated, and more deceptive, than the two men could have imagined…"A sentient creature with an emotional, internal life, just like all of us, trapped in a glass box,” reveals Writer/Director Alex Garland.
 
To bring about the daring and pristine EX MACHINA, Garland turned to his longtime collaborators, especially Set Decorator Michelle Day SDSA and Production Designer Mark Digby.

The main set was Nathan’s stunning, isolated research compound, which Digby, Day and their teams created from a hybrid of real spaces: the eco-lux Juvet Landscape Hotel plus a nearby residence by the same architect in Norway, and stages at Pinewood Studios, UK where they produced the subterranean living quarters and laboratory. The ultra-modern minimalist residence and lab set amid untamed terrain gave a visual representation of wild innovation, highly controlled…the boundless possibilities, yet a confined and confining structure.

Day praises Garland’s approach to filmmaking, “His fundamental belief is that we are a group of filmmakers working together equally. It is an amazing gift to me personally and a mini-hurray for our profession that my credit moved out of the roller to the card [main] credits, something Alex made happen.” Garland replies, “I’m not interested in the auteur theory of directing, I am much more into the craft of it. Collaboration allows us to explore and then hone to the essence.”

Garland delves into to this fascinating process in a conversation with SET DECOR:

 

SET DECOR: Thank you for taking the time to talk about the set decoration and Michelle Day’s work on the film.
 
Director/Writer Alex Garland: No, actually, it’s the other way around. Thank you. It’s very good to be able to talk about it.
 
Meesh/Michelle does stuff that directors get the credit for, because nobody knows what people like Meesh do and what they’re responsible for. I really feel quite self-conscious, very self-conscious actually, about the way [the credit for] her work gets kind of rolled up into other people’s work, when I know specifically what she’s done, what kind of input she’s had and the reasons I turn to her.
 
There is a moment near the end of the film when Ava, wearing a white dress, walks past a painting of a woman in white dress. This came from Meesh. The painting is by Gustav Klimt…it’s a portrait of the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein’s sister. Wittgenstein’s philosophy is key throughout the film—the name of Nathan’s company, Blue Book, is based on a collection of notes by Wittgenstein in which he theorized about thinking and consciousness as a symbol-based linguistic game.

 
SET DECOR: You mentioned the Klimt painting in an interview with Lauren Bradshaw:

“…Ava, at that moment, is wearing a white dress that echoes the painting. There are all of these strands being drawn together and that was Meesh doing the research into art, into Wittgenstein, into finding this beautiful painting, and knowing which wall to put it on. She knows because she has a nuanced understanding of where a director and a director of photography are likely to want to put a camera. She’s thinking about all of that. Because we know each other very well, Meesh sometimes puts these things in as surprises. I didn’t know that was going to be there until I walked onto the set and there it was. My jaw dropped. I thought it was such a smart, elegant, beautiful idea. Immediately the Director of Photography, Rob Hardy, and I decide we have to do a shot where Ava walks past the painting. Meesh is really the one that created that moment. Rob and I might capture it, but it’s Meesh’s brain that it came out of.”

Garland: That’s exactly what happens, really.
 
The process starts early with her. It just so happens that I saw her yesterday, and the reason I saw her is because at the moment, we’re trying to set up a movie to shoot maybe in March or April of next year. Over my whole filmmaking life, which is about 15 years, I’ve worked with the same group of people. Meesh has worked on every film I’ve worked on, and Mark Digby, the production designer, and several other people on the crew I’ve worked with again and again.
 
One of the first things in that process, as it was on the previous movie as well, is to say to Meesh and Mark, “Here’s the script. What are your thoughts?” And one of the things Meesh does initially is look for images and photos for reference, definition and inspiration. They may be to do with set, but often they end up being for many aspects. When Alicia Vikander’s character, Ava, puts on a cardigan and white stockings and has a short pixie haircut, you could attribute those things to wardrobe and hair, for example, but actually they came about because in that process, which I’m also going through now with Meesh on this other movie, Meesh found the images and said, “Look, here’s a way of presenting Ava where she looks feminine, but she also looks quite chaste…”, and, “What do you think about this pixie haircut? It could help make her look young.”
 
So Meesh’s influence, in my point of view, extends well beyond things to do with sets and the general props and the props that inform characters, like the paintings on the wall. It’s much more holistic. I talk to Meesh about every element, really. I think she has great talent.
 
As I said, it gets manifested in the sets and props, but she actually starts from the position of the character. She understands character. She thinks about character, and then she thinks about what represents that character on an internal level to determine how to represent it on an external level.
 
Now that works for sets and props, because she’d say, “Well this is the kind of painting that he’d have.” Or, “This is the kind of wine they would drink.” But it can also spread into everything else, for example, the cardigan.
 
SET DECOR: Yes, it’s that delving deep into the character and then the transmission of it in every way that the film shows.
 
Garland: Yes, exactly. So I think of Meesh as being sort of character-centric. There are varied H-of-Ds [heads of departments] in the production, each thinking in different terms from their POV, all bringing something incredibly valuable—but what Meesh does specifically, in my mind, relates to character.
 
So to give another example, in the previous movie we worked on together, DREDD, there’s a character called Ma-Ma who gets stoned a lot, she’s constantly getting high. Meesh said, “Let’s have a bath in the middle of her room—not a bath where you get clean, a bath to lie in and get stoned.” And some of the best imagery in that film, is of Ma-Ma being high, trailing her hand in the water and watching these iridescent water droplets fall from her fingers. Again, it really came from Meesh thinking, “Here is an interesting thing for this character to do…to get stoned in a bath.” And it’s her idea to position the bath in the center of the room, just because it’s a good place to get high.
 
In the script it was a settee, and Meesh said, “Let’s make it a bath.”
 
SET DECOR: That’s a perfect example of something Michelle had mentioned to us: One the reasons she loves working with you is that you have “really progressive ideas about filmmaking.” Because of that approach and your collaborative spirit, and with everyone having worked together so much, she says all the energies can be focused on maximizing the resources for these great scripts that you hand them. So it really is a full loop there.
 
Garland: Yeah. That’s great. One of the things about her is that she comes from a background of making indie movies and being resourceful…and using the resource in the right way. You know, don’t be profligate. Don’t get 20 versions, get one perfect version.
 
Actually, we all, in a way, come from that same background. And it does create a kind of camaraderie, a sort of sharing, and that kind of attitude. I’m glad Meesh calls it progressive. That’s the right thing to be, as far as I’m concerned! A part of it is that indie-movie sensibility, and although our budgets have expanded a bit, you know, I think we hold on to that sensibility as much as possible.
 
SET DECOR: As the master designer Dieter Rams, whom Michelle references in some of her set dressing choices, famously said, “Less, but better.” And it comes through in a heightened way in the look of this film. It’s impeccable. And it’s an impeccable script. There is no waste, no excess – it’s very clean, very tight.
 
Garland: Movies can lean toward excess. We all know that.
 
SET DECOR: Yes, and some of it we love, you know. Occasionally, it works.
 
Garland: Oh, it can work incredibly well. The excess can be part of the thrill in a way, and the scale of it, but we just aren’t working at that level. And I think it’s not really in our aesthetic. What we’re trying to do, all of us together, is to make bold moves and make them precisely. One of the best things about Meesh is that she’s not timid. She’ll do something very, very bold, and it will also be quite precise as well.
 
 
SET DECOR: We mentioned Klimt. What about some other key art pieces, the Pollock, the Titian?
 
Garland: The Pollock was slightly different, because that was in the script. There was something about what Pollock was trying to do as a painter that had to do with the automatic, to try to paint in an unconscious way, that fitted in a thematic…and actually a literal way…the issues that the film was talking about. So there was a Jackson Pollock painting specified, discussed in the script as a plot point, as a theme point. What Meesh does, is she extrapolates from that. Nathan is wealthy—money places no limits on his desires. He’s intelligent and cultured. So she says, “He’s got this Jackson Pollock. Well, that’s not going to be the only artwork he has. What if he has a Titian, for example? What are the artworks he would have?”
 
There’s a direct reason why a Pollock would be interesting to Nathan. While the Klimt is a more subtle reference, yet very specific…a painting that relates to the naming of Nathan’s company and the philosopher Wittgenstein. This is an incredibly appropriate painting for Nathan to have in his bedroom.
[Editor’s note: Check the photographs and captions re: the Titian.]
 
So basically, there’s something in the script, and what Meesh does, is she picks it up and runs with it.
 
SET DECOR: Perhaps another example would be the way the wall of Post-It notes almost looks like a piece of art as well, even referencing the Pollock in palette and scope…
 
Garland: The Post-It notes…the idea behind that was a kind of juxtaposition…the film has many. You’ve got this very large and wild outdoor space and then this extremely claustrophobic, overly controlled interior space—one of them made by nature, the other made by man. What you have in the film is a lot of digital stuff, including a wave of artificial intelligence that has been coded into a machine. The Post-It notes are not digital, they’re scrolled by hand, they’re jammed onto the wall in a fluid map-like pattern that only the person who’s sticking the notes on the wall can understand. So that was a visual juxtaposition of the digital and the analog.
 
SET DECOR: Another compelling juxtaposition was the corridor with the gallery of faces, of masks…the emptiness and link to humanness jointly portrayed…
 
Garland: Yes! While we were in pre-production, the place where I set my computer up to write, doing re-works on the script and stuff, was a large desk shared with Meesh. She was next to me, sort of at a right angle, and what that meant was that as Meesh was going through images, we could just have a sort of continual flowing conversation.
 
And one day, I saw that she had collected a bunch of images of masks. I didn’t exactly know why she had been collecting them, but immediately I thought, “These look fantastic.” She got hold of about probably 20 actual masks, and then we just laid them out on the floor. They were all kind of “folk” in some respects, but the grouping left room for using this face of Alicia as Ava that we had also made. And so it was really a question of us just standing there and trying to work out which were the most interesting ones to lead up to the one of Ava.
 
The idea that was in a very loose way an interpretation of that very famous image of an ape that starts to walk upright and then he becomes an upright homosapien…a timeline of the evolution of man. It’s essentially a mask version of that. So it begins with a very primitive folk art mask that looks a bit like a pig and ends up with this much more elegant and refined version of Alicia Vikander’s face.
 
SET DECOR: Yes, we see it in the film. The progression does show. It does translate. As an audience member, it was a wonderful reveal.
 
Garland: One of the interesting conversation points we always end up talking about in film, is what registered with people. And of course, the way it works is that it registers with some people and not with others. It’s part of the subjective response. What I think Meesh does, is she takes the position that if the person is going to look, they’re going to get rewarded.
 
SET DECOR: Yes, that’s speaking to a set decorator’s heart. There are many visual rewards in this film, including set dressing throughout the residence with subtle references to the vessel for the brain such as skulls, heads and totems.
Could we talk about the living and work quarters, this very effective embodiment of the duality of nature and modern man?
 
Garland: Yeah, sure. This has a bit of the indie-filmmaking embedded as well, because what happened there was, when we did a reckie in Norway—as you can tell, Meesh is a key person in the production—she had found some possible buildings that we could use. So she and I and a locations manager went around to a bunch of places.
 
The one we originally thought we were going to film at didn’t work out for various reasons, one being that it was just too expensive. We didn’t have the money to do it. We’d have to spend too much on greens and the gardener—it was like insanely expensive. We couldn’t make it work.
 
And so we ended up discovering the property you see in the film…and then partly what happens, to be honest about it, is because that’s where you’re going to shoot, you then tie that look into the overall aesthetic of the film.
 
SET DECOR: Mark has described it as, “Nathan is a man of great taste, intelligence, and discernment, and his home is about searching for perfection in the least adorned way. He lives in this modernist space made of post-modernist materials. It’s about concrete, it’s about glass; but it’s also about how these man-made elements frame a fantastic natural environment. It’s a mirror of how fake skin and mechanics frame Ava’s inner emotions and intelligence.”
 
Garland: Yes, it’s true. The other place we were looking at was quite Brutalist. It was a bit of massive concrete, which was not trying to open up to nature and bring it in. It felt almost defensive. I sometimes think about that, because it would have made for a different film. I’m not sure it would have made for a worse film—it was a really better location in lots of ways, but it certainly would have been a different film. It would have been less elegant. More brutal.
 
SET DECOR: As it turned out, though, this incredible setting that you chose gave a base to a modern eco-architecture/design, which was so fresh and innovative.
 
Garland: Yes, and the sets we did at Pinewood Studios were built to that location’s layout. So the film can’t lay claim to everything about that house, because we were corralled there by good luck and by no money!
 
SET DECOR: Ah! The gods putting something in your way…
 
Garland: I have to say, usually on a film, I’ve tended to feel the gods were working against us. You know, the sun is going behind the clouds, suddenly the rain washes away one of your sets, or some disaster…there seem to be many, often…but on this particular movie, we were blessed. I mean, we were insanely, ludicrously blessed day after day after day.
 
There’s a shot at the end of the film where a helicopter takes off. It’s one of the only crane shots we’ve got in the movie. The helicopter takes off from a highland field and flies away from us. It’s magic hour, the sunlight is slanted across the landscape and just catches off the side of the helicopter. And by the time that helicopter flew back again, the sun was below the mountains and we were done! That shot is like a Terrence Malick shot. It’s the kind of thing you hear that people waited three weeks to get, and we got it in like an hour and 20 minutes.
 
SET DECOR: And it was, indeed, an awesome shot. There were many! Thank you for such a thought-provoking, impeccable film.
 
Garland: Well, that’s really kind. But you know, because you do know, it’s not thank “me”, it’s all of us…
 
SET DECOR: All right, “Thank you” in plural!
 
Garland: Yeah, exactly, cool. [He laughs]
And the thing is, everything we’ve talked about Meesh for this film applies to all the other films as well.

 SET DECOR: That’s fantastic. We appreciate your awareness and acknowledgement…and we look forward to covering the next one! 



director's chair archives

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James Gray: THE LOST CITY OF Z 2017-04-17
Niki Caro: THE ZOOKEEPER'S WIFE 2017-04-03
Ken Olin: THIS IS US 2017-03-27
Theodore Melfi: HIDDEN FIGURES 2017-01-27
J.A. Bayona: A MONSTER CALLS 2017-01-03
Kelly Fremon Craig: THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN 2016-12-02
Warren Beatty: RULES DON'T APPLY 2016-11-25
Jeff Nichols: LOVING 2016-11-02
Derek Cianfrance: THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS 2016-09-10
Stephen Frears: FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS 2016-08-15
Susanna White: OUR KIND OF TRAITOR 2016-07-03
Gareth Neame: DOWNTON ABBEY 2016-06-13
George Miller: MAD MAX: FURY ROAD 2016-01-13
Tom Hooper: THE DANISH GIRL 2015-12-15
Sarah Gavron: SUFFRAGETTE 2015-12-15
Edward Zwick: PAWN SACRIFICE 2015-09-25
Bill Pohlad: LOVE & MERCY 2015-07-10
Richard Linklater: BOYHOOD 2015-02-04
James Marsh: THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING 2014-12-19
Bennett Miller: FOXCATCHER 2014-11-30
Michael Hirst: VIKINGS 2014-06-14
Amma Asante: BELLE 2014-05-06
Brian Percival: THE BOOK THIEF 2013-11-26
Alfonso Cuarón: GRAVITY 2013-10-13
J.J. Abrams: STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS 2013-06-27
Juan Antonio Bayona: THE IMPOSSIBLE 2013-01-17
Joe Wright: ANNA KARENINA 2012-12-18
Ang Lee: LIFE OF PI 2012-12-01
Ben Affleck: ARGO 2012-10-27
Sacha Gervasi: HITCHCOCK 2012-10-27
Luc Besson: THE LADY 2012-01-10
Tomas Alfredson: TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY 2011-12-13
Michel Hazanavicius: THE ARTIST 2011-12-08
Joe Wright: HANNA 2011-04-11
Mike Leigh: ANOTHER YEAR 2011-01-20
Tim Burton 2010-01-20
director's chair archives 2008-08-21


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